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The 2 most effective sales skills nobody ever talks about

Let’s go back down memory lane.

In my “old life” as a software engineer in Italy I learned a lot.

I often discount most of it, because let’s face it, I kind of hated it.

But in truth, there was a lot that I subconsciously absorbed and still apply to this day, in everything I do.

10 years at the same job leave a mark.

Two things I learned back then are some of the most underrated business and sales skills you can learn today.

Before I tell you what they are, I have to provide some context.

My job was programming automatic assembly machines. Lot’s of lines of code yes, but I was also responsible for making sure that software ran well with the electrical and pneumatic (pressured air used moving mechanical parts) systems.

Imagine these huge, sometimes as big as a room, machines working with thousands of sensors, tubes and valves with labels on them.

My software under the hood to make it all work automatically, with a press of a button.

When we were traveling for installations, my job also turned into sales. I had to get our machines approved by clients.

How?

By running days of repetitive production tests. Making sure each and every single one of the thousand sensors worked (any failure and we risked injuring the operators that worked with the machine!)…

…and “selling” the client on the reasons why we put all those safety measures and double-checks in place.

So what are the two lessons I learned and that could make your business twice as profitable and trustworthy?

Attention to detail + contextual proof.

Attention to detail is what separates you from the mass of dull, faceless businesses. The more specific and painstakingly attentive you are to your audience’s needs, the more you stand to convert prospects into avid fans.

Contextual proof is proof on steroids. Every time you write a piece of copy or claim, say to yourself “So, what? Prove it.” and then back that up with proof.

And it doesn’t need to be social proof like reviews or testimonials, either.

Showing rather than telling is proof. Show a screenshot of your app to back up what you just said. Show how simple and quick your sign up process is etc.

For example, even in my own processes with clients I do the same.

I just delivered a 50 page research report to a client.

And I backed up every hypothesis, or takeaway with proof, either user testing. video snippets, user recordings, heatmap screenshots, spreadsheet data and more.

Would you think a client would enjoy reading a 13,100 word report? Well, they loved it.

All because I injected it with contextual proof and I paid attention to details.

It’s hard work, but the rewards are more loyal and happy customers.

Want to be the next one?

Let’s talk.

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